Uinta

World Beer Cup 2014

Thursday, April 17, 2014 | 5 Rabbit, Contests, Old Dominion, Redhook, Starr Hill Brewery, Uinta, Widmer

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Last week was the World Beer Cup in Boulder, CO, with judgements over 96 different styles on a global level, with only three top beers named in each category and often dozens of entries into each. Starting in 1996, hundreds of brewers have entered their creations every two years, with more breweries entering with each competition. However, only a few come out on top, named best in their styles. This competition is considered the most prestigious beer competition in the world, and is not to be taken lightly.

Here’s a list of some of the brews that won that are available in our area.

Widmer Hefeweizen – Won Gold in the American Style Wheat Beer with Yeast category.

Starr Hill Whiter Shade of Pale – Won Gold in the American Belgo Style Ale category.

Redhook Audible Ale – Won Gold in the Classic English Style Pale Ale category.

Dominion Candy Belgian Tripel – Won Gold in the Belgian Style Tripel category.

Franziskaner Hefe-Weissbier Dunkel – Won Silver in the German Style Dark Wheat Ale category.

Uinta Bristlecone Brown - Won Bronze in the English Style Mild category.

For more information on the World Beer Cup, visit their website.

Superbowl Food and Beer Pairings

Thursday, January 23, 2014 | Prism, Susquhanna, Troegs, Uinta, Victory

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So the Eagles didn’t make it to the Superbowl this year, but don’t go canceling your party yet. We’ve got some ideas for some Denver and Seattle inspired meals, as well as the perfect beers to go with them. So root for you favorite team–even if it’s not really your favorite–and try one of these delicious combos.

Seattle Seahawks

Washington is known for its huge, delicious sockeye salmon, and there are so many recipes to choose from. Although salmon is always tasty, here’s three serving suggestions.

Smoked Salmon – Victory Golden Monkey’s sweet and spicy flavor pairs well with the brown sugar and light but rich texture of sweet salmon.

Glazed Salmon – Susquehanna’s HopFive IPA has enough hops to counter balance the sticky-sweetness of the glaze, and is light enough for seafood.

Smoked Salmon Dip – Troeg’s Dreamweaver pairs well with all sorts of seafood, and it’s light enough to serve with snacks/appetizers.

Denver Broncos

Where Washington is famous for salmon, Colorado’s claim to fame is its buffalo, which can be cooked in a number of different, delicious ways. These three options really bring out the sweet, rich flavor of the meat.

Buffalo Burgers – The smokiness of these burgers matches that of Prism Brewing’s Insana Stout, brewed with chocolate and bacon. Mmm!

Buffalo Brisket – East Coast Beer Co. Winter Rental’s sweet dark fruit notes will play up the sweetness of the meat in this brisket.

Buffalo Chili – Evolution Lot #3 IPA goes great with this spicy chili, as the bitterness will complement the hot peppers, and the light body

And of course, if you aren’t particular to either team but are still hosting a party, you can always play up the joke that each team is from a state where marijuana use is now legal, and serve everyone their own Uinta Dubhe (pronounced doo-bee).

Everyone have a safe and pleasant game time!

Uinta’s Punk’n Harvest Pumpkin Ale

Thursday, September 12, 2013 | Breweries, Fall, Featured Beer, Uinta

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Uinta’s Punk’n is a pumpkin ale with a bright amber hue and frothy head. The malts and hops are accented with a pumpkin flavor, spices and hints of vanilla and honey. With bright carbonation and a heavier body than expected from a 4% ABV beverage, this autumn drink goes great with roasted turkey and squash or pumpkin dishes. For a more daring serving option that’s sure to be a crowd-pleaser, try adding vanilla ice cream for a pumpkin ale float.

To Garnish or Not to Garnish

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 | 5 Rabbit, Hoegaarden, Ingredients, Shock Top, Sierra Nevada, Starr Hill Brewery, Uinta

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We all know that certain beers should be paired with certain foods. However, there’s another way food can be served with beer; as a garnish. There are a number of brews out there intended to be served with a slice of orange or lime, but what’s the purpose? And where did it all get started?

There is some debate over whether a slice of lemon in wheat beers was started in the 1960s in Germany, or whether it was an American invention. However, before the US really had any wheat beers of its own, it served these sorts of garnishes in German-themed bars along with Hefeweizens, suggesting it was a tradition started across the Atlantic. The whole idea was probably adopted as an imitation of cocktails, which were the drink of choice at bars at the time.

Since then, lemon, lime and orange slices have caught on as a popular addition to American wheat beers and cervezas. Most fans agree that the tartness of the fruit complements the yeasts used in the beers, and sometimes enhance the beer’s natural citrus flavor. Citrus isn’t the only garnish that has been used with beers, though.

Most people don’t really question why there are mixed nuts or pretzels at the bar, but they have significance. The salt on the nuts and pretzels can complement the flavor of a beer. Some bartenders go as far as hanging pretzels from the glass with certain beers. If you have a nut allergy—or don’t want to risk eating anything out of a bowl that countless others have stuck their hands into—you can add the salt directly to your beer or around the rim. This is an old tradition that has its roots in old wives’ tales of helping with cramps, and is not as common a way to garnish beer anymore. Still, there are flavored salts made especially for adding to your brew, and adding salt to beer can deflate the carbonation, which may be a plus to some drinkers looking to avoid a gassy stomach.

Salt and lime as a mix of garnishes is especially prevalent in states bordering Mexico. A michelada is a beer cocktail that uses salt, pepper, lime, hot sauce, and Worcestershire sauce. There are a number of takes on this simple recipe, using different beers, and non-traditional hot sauces like Sriracha. Chili peppers are another ingredient that is sometimes used for micheladas.

Chocolate is another beer garnish option, pairing especially well with stouts, barley wines, porters and some lambics. You can do this a number of ways, including powdering a glass with a coco mix, or making dark or milk chocolate ornaments.

There are a number of other less common garnishes, including green olives, which are usually paired with American or English pale ales, and cinnamon sugar rims, which go well with pumpkin ales. Fruit beers can also be paired with the fruit with which they are flavored, including berries, cherries and watermelon.

Some purists believe that adding any embellishment to a beer is just a way of covering up poor quality, though. They argue that the beer itself should be taste enough, and that adding anything to it only covers up the flavor, either to the detriment of a good brew, or the benefit of a beer with off or little flavors. Another complaint about some garnishes is that they deflate the head, and as with the case with salty choices, can affect the carbonation of the beer, which some believe should not be tampered with.

We say that garnishes are a matter of taste, and a fun way to experiment with a brew you already know and love. So, here’s a few suggested pairings that might make garnish doubters think twice.

Hoegaarden Original White Ale; garnish with slice of lemon hanging off the rim to accentuate the sweet, citrus flavor and offset the spicy clove.

Starr Hill Dark Starr Stout; rim glass with cocoa powder, or just pair with a small bar of dark chocolate.

Sierra Nevada Southern Hemisphere Harvest Fresh Ale; drop a couple of green olives into this IPA, and watch the bubbles gather around them, allowing them to float back to the top.

5 Rabbit 5 Lizard; lemon goes well with this latin-style witbier, and salt or hot sauce can also be a good choice of garnish.

Uinta Punk’n Harvest Pumpkin Ale; powder the rim of the glass with a cinnamon and sugar mix to add a little kick to this already delicious pumpkin ale.

Shock Top Raspberry Wheat; plopping a couple of raspberries into this popular Belgian-style wheat ale slightly strengthens the berry’s flavor… and you get a little treat in the bottom of your glass.

Uinta’s Cockeyed Cooper

Thursday, February 28, 2013 | Uinta

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Uinta’s Cockeyed Cooper is a bourbon barrel-aged barleywine with a sweet taste and and dark  reddish amber color. With fruity aromatic notes of dried cherries, raisins, and plum, this beer also has warmer flavors, including vanilla, caramel, roasted malt, and brown sugar. There is some alcohol flavor, as to be expected with barleywine, especially one aged in a bourbon barrel. The whiskey and barrel flavors really shine through in this brew, found in a corked bottle or on tap. Part of Uinta’s Crooked Line, this beer is great for those who like sweeter brews, especially barleywines or bourbon-aged beers.

Light Beer for the New Year

Thursday, January 10, 2013 | Breweries, Long Trail, Starr Hill Brewery, Tetley's, Uinta

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New Year’s has come and gone and we’re nearly half way through January. And if you’re like most people, sticking to that New Year’s resolution of losing weight or drinking less is probably in high gear. So to help fulfill your taste bud’s cravings we organized a list of some tasty brews that have a lighter flavor profile (theoretically less calories and carbs) and are sessionable with a lower ABV than most.

  • Long Trail Blackberry Wheat – A flavorful alternative to most light beers, popularity of this wheat ale has grown immensely since its 1996 creation. Available year-round, this beer is only 125 calories per 12oz bottle and has 6 grams of carbs. The touch of blackberry is just enough to satisfy your flavor-packed needs.
  • Uinta Wyld Extra Pale Ale – A World Beer Championship silver-medalist, this all-organic 4% ABV ale has a super light body this beer is impressive due to its robust hops characteristics.
  • Tetley’s English Ale – This UK import is a classic style English pale ale that is a mild 3.6% ABV offering. The beer has great flavor with characteristics of bready-malts and just a slight bitterness.
  • Starr Hill Dark Starr Stout – If the lighter-colored beers aren’t your style, you may be interested in the Dark Starr Stout, a Dry Irish Stout at only 4.2% ABV. The beer has flavors of coffee and unsweetened chocolate and a light body, making it easy going for anytime.

Uinta Canning and Expansion Plans

Friday, July 6, 2012 | Uinta

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In its 20th year of operation, and to accommodate a 67% sales growth in 2012, Uinta Brewing Company announces plans for expansion.

Read more…

Celebrate Sustainable Brewers

Friday, April 22, 2011 | Breweries, Long Trail, Spring, Sustainable, Uinta, Victory

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The Greatest Beers of the World would like to take a moment and celebrate the approach of Earth Day this week by showcasing American craft brewers who are making a difference in our world: Read more…

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