Starr Hill Brewery

Beer Style Resolution

Friday, January 20, 2017 | Anchor, Boxcar, East Coast Beer Co., Evolution, Fat Head's, Finch's, Fuller's, Fun, Goose Island, Hoegaarden, Ithaca, Keegan Ales, Kona, Lancaster Brewing, Long Trail, Magic Hat, New Belgium, Old Dominion, Redhook, Rogue, Spencer Trappist Brewery, Starr Hill Brewery, Susquhanna, Troegs, Uinta, Victory, Widmer

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Want a New Year’s resolution you won’t want to abandon in a couple months? Why not challenge yourself to step outside your comfort zone and try new styles of beer. It’s easy to decide you like a select few varieties and rarely try anything that doesn’t fit in that box, but you never know what you might be missing.

Here we’ve listed a number of different common styles, as well as a few examples of each. An easy way to go through the list is just to pick one from each category and try it, but if you’re up for more of a challenge, try going through all the list before the end of the year is up. Could be you find your new favorite brew.

Amber/Red Ales:

Troegs Nugget Nectar

Goose Island Autumn Ale

Blonde Ale -

Victory Summer Love

Kona Big Wave Golden Ale

New Belgium Whizbang

Brown Ale -

Rogue Hazelnut Brown Ale

Bock/Doppelbock -

Lancaster Billy’s Bock

Starr Hill Snow Blind Doppelbock

Extra Special Bitter -

Magic Hat Wooly

Redhook Extra Special Bitter

Gose -

Victory Kirsch Gose

Uinta Ready Set Gose

Long Trail Cranberry Gose

Hefeweizen -

Troegs Dreamweaver

Starr Hill The Love

India Pale Ale -

Evolution Lot #3

Ithaca Flower Power

Fat Head’s Head Hunter

American Lager -

Kona Long Board Island Lager

Anchor Steam Beer

Susquehanna Goldencold Lager

Marzen -

Victory Festbier

Susquehanna Oktoberfest

Goose Island Oktoberfest

Milk/Sweet Stout -

Lancaster Milk Stout

Pale Ale –

Spencer Trappist Ale

Prism ParTea Pale Ale

Victory Headwaters

Pilsner -

BeachHaus Pislner

Troegs Sunshine Pils

Porter -

Fuller’s London Porter

Anchor Porter

Lancaster Shoo-Fly Pie Porter

Saison -

Goose Island Sofie

Old Dominion Gigi’s Farmhouse Ale

Victory Helios

Stout -

Old Dominion Morning Glory Espresso Stout

Magic Hat Heart of Darkness

Troegs Javahead

Tripel -

Old Dominion Candi Tripel

Victory Golden Monkey

Wild Ale -

Goose Island Lolita

New Belgium Le Terroir

Rogue Beard Beer

Witbier -

New Belgium Tartastic

Hoegaarden Original White

Sweet and Bitter: Fruit IPAs

Thursday, May 26, 2016 | Evolution, Magic Hat, New Belgium, Old Dominion, Starr Hill Brewery, Uinta

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You’ve probably noticed it. A definite trend in the India Pale Ale scene that is only gaining speed as summer comes around the bend. Fruit has entered the playing field in a huge way in the last few years–though the concept of brewing the style with fruit is certainly older than that–and it seems like every brewery is coming out with their own rendition of the Fruit IPA. Old favorites are getting a new twist and new brews are being born with fruitiness as their sole intention. The trend isn’t exactly surprising. American hop varieties have been moving to more juicy citrus and pithy flavors and many breweries have been recreating fruit flavors with a blend of hops and malt, so the craft beer drinker’s palate has been ready for this move for awhile. It was only a matter of time before the idea of adding real fruit really took off, and it’s likely a style that will be around for awhile.

New Belgium Citradelic – Bright citra hops and tangerine peel work as a power duo in this brew for an overall flavor that is both smooth and packs a juicy aroma. 6% ABV

Magic Hat Electric Peel – The zest and flesh of grapefruit dominate the palate in this crisp ale. It’s almost easy to mistake it for a glass of juice. 6% ABV

Evolution Pine’Hop’le – A complex hop aroma carries hints of mango, citrus and melon, but the taste is unmistakably pineapple and well-balanced between sweet and bitter. 6.8% ABV

Starr Hill The Hook – A crisp and refreshing grapefruit ale that is sessionable, so you don’t have to worry about going back for another. 4.9% ABV

Dominion GPA – This one sets itself apart by including zest in its brewing process, creating a more subtle grapefruit flavor amidst hoppiness. 6% ABV

Uinta Hop Nosh Tangerine – A fresh splash of tangerine flavor in every mouthful, this is a brilliant twist on what is already a classic brew. 7.3% ABV

Starr Hill King of Hop Series

Monday, April 18, 2016 | Starr Hill Brewery

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If you’re an IPA lover, you’ve got to try these. This hoppy series starts with a base brew and expands from there with three additional varieties. King of Hop is numero uno, a imperial IPA that’s dry-hopped to showcase the citrus notes of Pacific Northwest hops. After that, you’ve got the same brew, but with a hint of Grapefruit added to fully accentuate the bitterness. Next up is the Lemon-Lime, packed full of real zest flavor that further highlights citric flavors. And last, Habanero is added to the fourth brew, giving it a pleasant heat and pulling out flavors in the pepper than go unnoticed in other foods.

Look forward to these 10 special draft events in the coming weeks:

Thursday, April 7

Capone’s
East Norriton
6 PM

Thursday, April 28

CJ’s Dog House
Kulpsville
6 PM

The Barley Mow
West Reading
5 PM

Saturday, May 7

Union Jack’s
Glenside
12 Noon

Wednesday, May 11

Garret Hill Ale House
Bryn Mawr
6-8 PM

Thursday, May 12

Ganley’s Pub
Sinking Spring
5 PM

Friday, May 13

Craft Beer Store
Springfield
4 PM

Wednesday, May 25

Dog and Bull
Bensalem
5 PM

A Brief History of Pumpkin Ale

Friday, October 9, 2015 | Evolution, Long Trail, Magic Hat, Old Dominion, Redhook, Rogue, Shock Top, Starr Hill Brewery, Troegs, Uinta

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To look at the market, one might assume that pumpkin ales are a recent invention, riding on the coattails of certain spiced coffees and dessert items. Culturally, pumpkins are synonymous with Halloween, Thanksgiving and all things autumnal. But the history of pumpkin ales stretches even back further than the history of this country, when European colonists first began to settle in the Americas, and Native Americans shared the secrets of the crop.

Most school children learn of the hardships of the pilgrims, and how their the Native Americans aided in their plight with knowledge of the land and the crops which could be grown there. Pumpkins are a perfect example of this exchange. When planted alongside corn and beans (the three sisters, as the natives referred to them), they were simple to grow and yielded many fruit for minimal effort. This squash was an easily-cultivated alternative in a lot of foods, from baked goods to soups. Pumpkins were so prolific, one of America’s first folk songs mentions their necessity.

“Instead of pottage and puddings and custards and pies,
Our pumpkins and parsnips are common supplies;
We have pumpkin at morning and pumpkin at noon;
If it was not for pumpkins we should be undone
… Hey down, down, hey down derry down….
If barley be wanting to make into malt
We must be contented and think it no fault
For we can make liquor, to sweeten our lips,
Of pumpkins and parsnips and walnut-tree chips.”

So it’s not surprising that when malted barley, the main source of sugar in fermentation, was hard to come by, pumpkins were used as a readily available resource. As easily grown as pumpkins were, pumpkin ale remained a regular beverage into the 18th century. But the long-held view of pumpkins as a poor-man’s food overcame the popularity, especially as good quality malt became more accessible, and pumpkin ale went out of fashion. Occasionally, it had a small revival as a flavoring agent, but none so great as the one that has bloomed in the last thirty years when home brewers and craft breweries have taken such inspiration as from George Washington’s pumpkin ale recipes or trying to capture pumpkin pie in a bottle to create a new, flavorful generation of pumpkin ales. Adding spices like nutmeg, cinnamon and clove has become commonplace, and most pumpkin ales are not fermented pumpkin sugars, but simply use pumpkin as an adjunct. Though the newest rendition of the style may be far different, it still harkens back to a time when pumpkins were the only crop to be used in a variety of dishes.

If you’ve somehow managed to miss this phenomena, here’s a few pumpkin ales worth a try:

Jacque au Lantern – Evolution

Imperial Pumpkin Ale – Long Trail

Wilhelm Scream – Magic Hat

Out of Your Gourd Pumpkin Porter – Redhook

Pumpkin Patch Ale – Rogue Ales

Pumpkin Wheat – Shock Top

Boxcarr Pumpkin Porter – Starr Hill

Master of Pumpkins – Troegs

Punk’n – Uinta

Pumpkin Ale – Susquehanna Brewing

Baked Pumpkin – Lancaster Brewing

Country Pumpkin – Ithaca Beer

Pumpkick – New Belgium

Starr Hill 2015 Collaboration Tour Kicks Off with O’Hara’s

Wednesday, June 10, 2015 | Carlow, Collaboration, Starr Hill Brewery

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Starr Hill believes beer is made to be shared, and that brewing can be more fun when the process is shared with friends. That’s why they’re going on tour and collaborating with seven different craft breweries the world-over.

The headlining collaboration of this tour is Carlow Brewing Co/O’Hara’s Brewery. These two breweries are brought together from across the Atlantic by each of their award-winning Irish stouts, they’re collaborating on something entirely different; a Session Red IPA to be released in Ireland on July 4th, in celebration of American and Irish independence. And in early 2016, Carlow/O’Hara’s will travel to Virginia to produce a US-based collaboration brew that will be released on St. Patrick’s Day the next year. Not only will they be creating awesome beers to drink, but they’ll be learning about the growing craft beer communities in each country.

Stateside, Starr Hill will be continuing on its tour, visiting six US breweries and various music events, making for a trip full of festivities, good beer and new friends.

Summer Shandy Love

Friday, May 22, 2015 | Kona, Shock Top, Sierra Nevada, Starr Hill Brewery, Susquhanna, Widmer

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By now, you’re probably familiar with shandies; the beer cocktail that is typically mixed with lemonade, but could include a soft drink such as ginger ale, other light sodas, or orange juice. They’ve become a popular addition to many breweries’ lineups, particularly as the weather warms and craft drinkers look for refreshing beverages. Usually sweet and often tart, these mixes are a great fruity break from maltier or hoppier alternatives. They also tend to be lower in alcohol content, due to their mixed nature, so make a great go-to for day-time get-togethers like picnics and BBQs or just relaxing on the deck on a weekend.

The idea of mixing a sweet drink with beer might seem strange at first, but it’s been going on for a long time, and with good reason. The earliest record of a beer cocktail of its ilk is from 1853, in the form of the shandygaff, a beer and ginger ale mix. Other countries have their own versions, including the Radler (German for cyclist), a beer mixed with sparkling lemonade, which supposedly originated in Munich in 1922. France has its version, the Panache, which is close to the Radler definition. Even Singapore has a cocktail where beer is mixed with tonic water, called Kip Lin after its inventor.

Where shandies were traditionally mixed on-site, you can now conveniently buy them pre-mixed in a bottle. Here are a few to try:

Widmer Bros Hefe Shandy – A hefeweizen made with Lemon Drop hops and mixed with natural lemonade for a lip-smacking mix. 4.2% ABV

Shock Top Shandy – Another wheat beer with a big lemon taste and a spicy yeast to back it up. 4.2% ABV

Susquehanna Shady Spot Shandy – This shandy harkens back to the traditional English style: dry and refreshing. 4.7% ABV

While these shandies are a great grab-n-go option, and definitely worth a try, you might want to try your hand and making one of your own. If you’re unsure of where to begin, let’s go over a few simple recipes that can get you started, and you can take it from there.

Big Lemon Wave

1 12oz bottle Kona’s Big Golden Wave

4oz Fresh lemonade, pulp optional

Mix, garnish with lemon rind for aroma.

Grapefruit Popfest

6oz bottle Sierra Nevada Summerfest

6oz Pure grapefruit juice, pulp optional

Splash sparkling water

Mix all, garnish with slice of lemon. Use one 12oz bottle for two servings.

Ginger Love

12oz bottle Starr Hill The Love Hefeweizen

6oz Ginger ale, such as Schweppes

Mix, garnish with either a thin slice of fresh ginger or slice of lemon

Crafty Recipes

Friday, April 3, 2015 | Anchor, Boxcar, Carlow, Food, Keegan Ales, Kona, Leffe, Old Dominion, Rogue, Starr Hill Brewery, Troegs, Victory

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A beverage can be a great complement to a meal, or may be enjoyed on its own in partnership with only a great moment. But when simply drinking your favorite beers isn’t enough, there is another step to take in your appreciation for good craft brews. Eating them.

Just like wine is often used in culinary creations, beer can add wonderful flavors to all sorts of food, particularly since there is such a wide variety in flavors between all the styles of beer. Dips, sauces, glazes, desserts, breads, even pickled vegetables can all be made with a little help from your go-to beverage.

Googling recipes that call for beer can yield an overwhelming number of results. If you aren’t sure where to start, take a look at this list of recipes, and try making a few with our suggested beers.

IPA Beer Cheese DipStarr Hill Northern Lights

Beer-Battered FishKona Longboard Island Lager

Cream Cheese Beer Pancakes with Strawberry Saison SyrupHoegaarden and Anchor Saison

Beer-Soaked Grilled CheeseLeffe Brune

Craft Beer Can ChickenKeegan Ales Bine Climber or Troegs Cultivator

Dry Stout Beef StewO’Hara’s Irish Stout

Coconut Curry Beer Chicken SoupRogue MoM Hefeweizen

Slow Cooker Beer Brisket SandwichesDominion Morning Glory Espresso Stout

Belgian Tripel & Honey Black Pepper Chicken WingsVictory Golden Monkey

And if you’d like to try your hand at coming up with your own recipe, here is a brief and general guide on flavors to get you started.

Porters and Stouts – These dark beers are for adding intense flavors to a dish. Chocolate and coffee-flavored beers can be used in either rich desserts like chocolate cake or marinated meat dishes like ribs or pulled pork. Stews and soups can gain a bitterness from a dry stout or porter, while milk stouts can add a roasty sweetness to a glaze or sauce.

Wheat Beers – Fruity flavors are what hefeweizens and witbiers complement best. They’re a great addition to cakes, breads or tarts with fruit accents, and round out the flavors of sweet glazes and BBQ sauces. Honey, citrus, apricot, peach and berries are all flavors to add wheat beers to. Once you’ve tried those combinations, be adventurous and try it in combination with savory dishes like pasta and cheese sauces.

Fruity Beers, Barleywine and Saisons – These are flavors that can be a little more difficult to endow food with. It’s usually good to pair fruity beers and saisons with like flavors–candied fruits, ginger and other sweet-and-spicy notes–but barleywines need bold flavors to compete with. Roasted meats and heavy desserts like pumpkin dishes and dark chocolates can benefit from just a few tablespoons.

IPAs, Pale Ales and Pilsners – IPAs generally go with spicy dishes, but don’t limit yourself to that. Cheese sauces, breads, lemony dishes, seafood, and chicken can all benefit from the hops in the right conditions. Pale ales and pilsners can replace IPAs in many dishes, especially when looking for a milder flavor, and are more easily added to desserts.

Brown/Amber Ales – These sweet and mild brews are great for roasted chicken, pork, sticky-sweet desserts and sweet breads. Sometimes it can be added to beef-centric recipes, but it is the perfect level of flavor to be eaten with white meats.

If you’re just beginning to cook with beer, try adding it to sauces, glazes, and marinades, or try your hand at a beer bread, and before long, you’ll be looking for ways to add it into dinner every night.

Starr Hill Redesigned

Friday, April 3, 2015 | Starr Hill Brewery

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If you’re looking for some Grateful Pale Ale or Starr Pils, it’d behoove you to know that they’ve had an update in their packaging. Storyware, a graphic design company based in their own Charlottesville, VA, worked to bring new life to the brand, revamping the main logo and six labels to start with. So if you’re out to get Northern Lights IPA, Grateful Pale Ale, The Love Wheat Beer, Double Platinum Imperial IPA or Jomo Vienna-Style Lager, be sure to look extra careful to make sure you’ve spotted it.

“This new imagery absolutely elevates our look to the level of our beer through consistency and quality,” said Brian McNelis, Starr Hill’s President and CEO. “We believe these new designs will resonate with our devoted fans, as it truly does with our team at the brewery, and encourage those new to Starr Hill to discover our award-winning beers.”

Beer’s Favorite Holiday

Friday, March 13, 2015 | Carlow, Carlsberg, Rogue, Starr Hill Brewery

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St. Patrick’s Day is in just a few days, and we hope that you’ve got some fun plans for the holiday. If you haven’t given any thought to what you might be drinking that day, we’ve got some great choices that definitely beat the green-dyed beer some places will be serving.

Victory Donnybrook Stout – This is great as a sessionable Irish stout that packs all the flavor of its high-alcohol brothers. This is draft only, so it’s a good choice for your keg at a party.

O’Hara’s Irish Stout – This craft stout from Ireland has won several awards and likens itself to the way stouts used to be brewed in Ireland. It has coffee and light licorice flavors.

Rogue Irish Lager – If you aren’t so into stouts, this light Euro lager is a great change of pace that still harkens to an Irish style with its smooth, mellow flavor and apple crisp finish.

Carlsberg - Or go for the #1 lager in Ireland itself, which conveniently comes in a festive green bottle.

Starr Hill Dark Starr Stout – Another flavorful Irish stout with hints of coffee and dark chocolate, and a velvety body.

Pumpkin Brews for Thanksgiving

Thursday, November 20, 2014 | Long Trail, Magic Hat, Rogue, Shock Top, Starr Hill Brewery

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You may think that pumpkin ales go out with Halloween, but they are actually the perfect addition to any Thanksgiving meal. Try pulling any of these out for the family, and they’re sure to please everyone.

Starr Hill Boxcar Pumpkin Porter – This traditional English-style porter has a twist of pumpkin to add the flavor of the harvest season. Its light spicing allow the flavors of the pumpkin itself to really shine through. Great for hearty main courses, or an after-dinner drink. 4.7% ABV

Shock Top Pumpkin – When talking pumpkin beers, one doesn’t usually think about witbier, but the combination is surprisingly good. Goes great with lighter desserts or fruit salads, like ambrosia. 5.2% ABV

Long Trail Imperial Pumpkin – The perfect warming brew for these cold, November nights. A blend of nutmeg, cinnamon, ginger and cloves spice this finely crafted brew, and there’s just enough hops to make a clean finish. 8% ABV

Uinta Punk’n – Pumpkin, spice and hints of vanilla and honey make this truly one of the best and most interesting pumpkin ales of the season. Goes great with roasted turkey, squash and pumpkin dishes. Plus, it’s got organic ingredients. 4% ABV

Rogue Pumpkin Patch Ale – Made with pumpkins out of their own patch, this ale is chocked full of pumpkin pie flavor. Great with any dessert, and pork, if you’re wanting to stray from the traditional turkey. 5.6% ABV

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